Category: eos-blog

“THE NATION OF KEN,” BY BRUCE JENKINS

“The Nation of Ken,” by Bruce Jenkins, a 22,000-word XXL profile on big-wave surfer Ken Bradshaw, ran in the Spring 2001 issue of Surfer’s Journal. This version has been slightly edited from the original.  *  *  *  A lesser man would be dead drunk by now. A weaker man would be railing against a system...

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LONG READ: “THE BAY: WAIMEA BAY IS STILL DEFINING THE SURFER’S CONCEPTS OF MASS, VOLUME, POWER AND SANITY,” BY ALLSTON JAMES

“The Bay,” by Allston James, ran in the September 1990 issue of SURFER Magazine. This version has been slightly edited and reformatted.   *  *  *  DEEP ROOTS Waimea Bay has always been a place that defined limits, both oceanic and human. Name a surfer anywhere who hasn’t wondered if he would ever have the desire and...

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TOM WOLFE “PUMP HOUSE GANG” BONUS MATERIAL

Tom Wolfe wrote his surfing-themed “Pump House Gang” essay in 1966. The same title was used for Wolfe’s 1968 book, made up of 15 stories that had been published over the previous two years, either in the London Weekend Telegraph or the Sunday magazine section of the New York World Journal Tribune. An excerpt from...

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“MAC MEDA DESTRUCTION CO. A JOKE? AUTHORITIES DON’T FIND TEEN GROUP FUNNY”

The San Diego Evening Tribune ran this article on June 21, 1965. Later that year, writer Tom Wolfe arrived in La Jolla to research his “Pump House Gang” essay (read here), based in part on local surfers associated with the Mac Meda Destruction Company, described by Wolfe as an “underground society.” It wasn’t underground so...

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“THE PUMP HOUSE GANG,” BY TOM WOLFE

Virginia-born Tom Wolfe invented the stylized exclamation-point-filled New Journalism with a 1963 Esquire feature titled “There Goes (Varoom! Varoom!) That Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby.” For decades, Wolfe was one of America’s most popular and acclaimed authors in both fiction and nonfiction, and his bestselling books include The Right Stuff (1979), The Bonfire of the Vanities...

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“THE ULTIMATE THRILL,” MARK FOO PROFILE BY MATT WARSHAW (1987)

“Mark Foo: The Ultimate Thrill,” by Matt Warshaw, ran in the February 1987 issue of SURFER Magazine. This version has been slightly edited.  *  *  *  It’s a natural inclination for people to categorize, assign labels, simplify. So Mark Foo is now known primarily as a Waimea man. He has a slight problem with this...

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“NAS ONDAS DO SURF” (IN THE OCEAN WAVES) 1978: FIRST FULL-LENGTH SURF MOVIE FROM BRAZIL

Nas Ondas Do Surf, Brazil’s first full-length surf movie, came out in 1978. It is not a lost treasure, exactly. It breaks no ground, brings no green-and-yellow brazuca flair to the genre. Nas Ondas is as unimaginative as 95% of what was coming out of American and Australia, in other words. Then again, Brazil in...

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“A MATURE MAN WILL NEVER REMAIN A HOT-DOGGER,” AND OTHER READINGS FROM THE BOOK OF SAM

Sam Reid was a New Jersey-born surfing pioneer who rode Malibu with Tom Blake in the 1920s, was befriended by the Kahanamoku brothers, and was the ranking lifeguard in Santa Cruz for decades. He is also recalled as surfing’s first outspoken “it was better back then” curmudgeon, a role he seems to have picked up...

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SAM REID: THE ORIGINAL GRUMPY OLD SURFER

New Jersey’s Sam Reid learned to surf in 1912, at age seven, after watching Duke Kahanamoku give a wave-riding demonstration in Atlantic City. Reid later moved to California, then Hawaii, surfing and socializing with Tom Blake and the Kahanamoku brothers. Blake and Reid are credited as the first surfers to ride Malibu, in 1927. Reid...

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“GOODBYE SUNSHINE SUPERMAN,” JOCK SUTHERLAND PROFILE, BY MATT WARSHAW

“Goodbye Sunshine Superman” ran in the Winter 1994 issue of Surfer’s Journal. This version has been slightly shortened and edited.  *  *  *  There is great appeal, maybe even cosmic justice, in the idea that Jock Sutherland, master of critical positioning, rode deeper and cleaner than anybody during Our Holy Year of Gigantic Surf, 1969....

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“BEN” – BEN AIPA PROFILE BY BILL HAMILTON AND GERRY LOPEZ

“Ben,” a two-part profile written by Bill Hamilton and Gerry Lopez, ran in the September 1972 issue of SURFER. This version has been slightly edited and shortened.  *  *  * He’s a big, heavy-set guy, weighing somewhere between 225 and 250 pounds. Amazingly enough, this isn’t a detriment to his surfing, which is remarkably smooth,...

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U-TURN ON THE “NIGHT TRIP”? JOCK SUTHERLAND ANSWERS ALLAN WEISBECKER

In August 2020, EOS posted “Jock’s Night Trip,” by Allan Weisbecker, an article that originally ran in a 1992 issue of Surfing. “Night Trip” is possibly the most 1969 story on the whole site, flitting about from the Apollo moonwalk to the Mets to Woodstock and beyond, then zeroing in on the North Shore for...

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BURNING MAN ’64: DROPPING INTO THE WORLD TITLES at MANLY BEACH

And lo the story has been handed down through time, nigh on three score years now, one surf historian to the next—that Joey Cabell bunged himself out a world title in 1964 because he dropped in on other competitors like Tom Carroll on a six-shot espresso high. There was a new “sportsmanship” rule in place...

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“BOBBY BROWN, THE SURFER TREND-SETTER,” BY MIDGET FARRELLY

Midget Farrelly’s tribute to Bobby Brown ran in the August 27, 1967, edition of the Sydney Morning Herald. A week earlier, Brown had been killed in a bar fight not far from his home in Cronulla. This version has been slightly edited and shortened.   *  *  *  Australian surfing suffered a great loss this week...

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ORAL HISTORY: THE QUIET, BRILLIANT, TRAGIC BOBBY BROWN

Bobby Brown of Cronulla, a smooth-surfing teenage finalist in the 1964 world titles, was as quiet and unassuming as he was talented. In 1967, just after filming what would be a star turn in Paul Witzig’s Hot Generation, Brown was killed in a bar fight. He was 20. The following quotes are from various sources,...

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1975: “THE WISA HAPPENING AT MALIBU,” BY KEVIN NAUGHTON

Kevin Naughton’s article about the debut Women’s International Surfing Association pro contest at Malibu, with photos by longtime travel partner Craig Peterson, ran in the December 1975 issue of SURFER. This version has been slightly edited and shortened.   *  *  *  Craig’s plan was ingenious, maybe even brilliant, but I still felt uneasy. In fact,...

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“SEVENTIES PRO GENESIS,” BY PATTI PANICCIA – THE ORIGINS OF WOMEN’S PRO SURFING

This article was published in the Spring 2003 issue of Surfer’s Journal. This version has been slightly edited.  *  *  *  There’s a photo hanging on my wall that always attracts people’s attention. It’s not a particularly wonderful shot. It’s black and white, and barely in focus, and it’s aged so much over the years...

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ORAL HISTORY: REMEMBERING AUSSIE TEEN-TERROR KEVIN BRENNAN

Kevin Brennan was a tough freckle-faced kid from Bondi Beach who won both the junior and senior divisions of the 1965 New South Wales State Championships. He was just 15. Two years later, filmmaker Paul Witzig captured Brennan and pal Bobby Brown surfing Noosa, and the resulting sequence was a highlight of Witzig’s 1967 film...

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“FAITHLESS LOVER TURNED TO STONE,” ANCIENT HAWAIIAN LOVE-GONE-BAD SURFING LEGEND

This surf-themed legend was recounted by Honolulu Star-Bulletin writer Clarice B. Taylor in her “Tales About Hawaii” column on November 26, 1958. This version has been slightly edited.  *  *  *  As you travel along Kamehameha Highway on the western end of Oahu Island, you pass Waialee and come to a barren ridge above Paumalu...

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1977: “BROADS WHO RIDE BOARDS,” BY PHIL JARRATT, TRACKS MAGAZINE

Phil Jarratt’s feature on women’s surfing ran in the June 1977 issue of Tracks. As surf historian Geoff Cater noted on his website surfresearch.com, “While the use of ‘Broads’ in the article title was even then disparaging, in the same issue the editor [Jarratt] inaugurated a new page for kneeboarders, under the header ‘Cripples Corner’.”...

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1969: EXCERPT FROM “HANG DEAD HAWAIIAN STYLE”

Patrick Morgan was one of several pen names used by durable American-born pulp-fiction novelist George Snyder. Hang Dead Hawaiian Style was the first novel in Morgan’s nine-book “Operation Hang Ten series,” published from 1969 to 1973, featuring surfer-swinger-undercover CIA agent Bill Cartwright.  *  *  *  Jim Dana, head of West Coast Headquarters of Operation Hang...

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HOT SURF PULP! ALL 10 BOOKS FROM “OPERATION HANG TEN”

George Snyder, writing under the name Patrick Morgan, produced his 10-book hardboiled surf-pulp Operation Hang Ten series between 1969 and 1973. Surfer-playboy-spy Bill Cartwright is the Hang Ten headliner. None of the books were reviewed in newspapers or magazines but pop-culture enthusiast Joe Kenney, on his website Glorious Trash, had this to say about the...

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1967: “PULPS AND POT: SURFING PROBLEMS,” BY PATRICK MCNULTY

“Pulps and Pot: Surfing Problems,” by Patrick McNulty (above), ran on SURFER’s editorial page in the September 1967 issue. McNulty was SURFER’s editor from 1965 until 1968 when he was replaced by Drew Kampion.   *  *  *  The changing problems facing the sport of surfing are reflected in mail crossing the editor’s desk. A few...

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“QUIET TRIUMPH,” THE PAM BURRIDGE STORY, BY DC GREEN

“Quiet Triumph: the Remarkable Journey of Pam Burridge,” by DC Green, ran in the Summer 1998 issue of Deep magazine. This version has been slightly shortened and edited.  *  *  *  Consider this: at the time of writing, Pam Burridge and Trudy Todd were the sixth- and third-highest rated surfers, respectively, on the ASP world...

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“IN TRIM: DONALD TAKAYAMA,” BY SCOTT HULET

Scott Hulet’s profile on Donald Takayama ran in the Summer 1993 issue of Longboard magazine. The version below has been shortened and slightly edited. *  *  * Donald Takayama, aka “Fuzzy,”  “Bird’s-nest,” and, naturally, “DT,” led what was probably the most idyllic childhood a surfer could possibly envision. Surrounded by the High Council of Hawaiian...

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